On or Off?

January 11, 2017

Job Search

off-on-buttons

Frequently clients ask me if they should leave certain optional items off of their resume – community activities, work experience beyond 10 years and dates on education are just a few examples.  Usually there is a worry about being screened out based on assumptions recruiters or hiring mangers might make, sometimes around sensitive issues (age, ability, faith, personal values).

I prefer talking about how to get screened in.

When wondering what to include in your resume, ask yourself two questions:

1) Is it relevant?
2) Do you feel more confident leaving it on or taking it off?

Let’s take relevancy first.
Watch out for being too narrow in your definition of relevant.  I don’t mean is it only literally relevant to the job description.  I mean is it relevant to who you are and what you can do?  Is it connected to the values of the organization you are applying to? Does it match up with what you learned about the position through networking (information that might not be in the posting)? If you say “yes” to the relevancy question and choose to include an item, make sure you explain why it is there.  Tell them how it correlates – doing so leaves less room for assumptions.

So how about confidence?
What you put on your resume tells employers what you want to talk about.   Own this document – make it something you are proud of, excited to discuss.  If you have an optional item on your resume that gives you pause, that you can’t address confidently, that worries you – consider leaving it off.  If this item is relevant and talking about it taps into positivity and passion, consider including it.

We can’t predict what each person who reads our resume wants to see or what particular interesting tidbit could open up conversation.

We can know what is pertinent to the work we want and come from a place of self assurance.

Choose based on what you know!

 

Aubrie De Clerck,  PCC CPC
www.coachingforclarity.net
aubrie@coachingforclarity.net
503-810-2907

Aubrie is a Career Development and Transition Coach, with her own private practice in Portland. Her career history spans corporate, non-profit and self employment, giving her wide perspective on the world of work. Aubrie is known for being highly inspirational and deeply practical, helping people open doors to a lifetime of fulfilling work. Most of all, she is passionate about helping people of all ages and phases of life get the most out of their work life.

Advertisements
,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: